Value of Scaling

Scaling can be a tough subject for some people. They don’t want to feel like they are less than others and want to be able to complete workouts just like their friends in class. This sometimes leads individuals to go too heavy with a barbell or attempt a gymnastic movement that may be too advanced. Scaling allows athletes to stay safe as well as progress in an effective way. Maybe you have found yourself in the following scenario?

The music is blaring and you are surrounded by all different types of individuals who are alongside you repeatedly lifting a barbell from the ground to overhead via a snatch. You are completing Isabell, which is 30 snatches for time. Sweat pours out of you as your lungs burn to finish the final 3 reps. You place the bar down after your last rep and collapse to the floor. You are the first one done and soon the taste of blood forms in your mouth as you heavily inhale and exhale from emptying the tank and hitting your lactic threshold. After catching your breath you sit up to cheer on your classmates as they complete their final reps. 

After everyone is done, fellow classmates come by congratulating you on your job well done, offer fist bumps and high fives. Even your coach comes over to compliment you on your snatch form. You feel great about the workout and the work you did. However, when it comes time to input your score you review the whiteboard to see what everyone else has done and notice that you completed the workout at the lightest weight of anyone in the gym that day. You think to yourself that you wish you did heavier weight and that maybe having completed it so fast wasn’t right because everyone went a little slower than you. 

In the above scenarios you start to devalue your work completed when you compare to others in class. It’s great to be competitive and push to challenges others and yourself to push hard alongside others. However, when you start to doubt the work you did and its impact because it was lighter, faster/slower, when compared to others you take away from the value of the hard work you did. This can be a defeating feeling and lead to second guessing your scaling decisions. 

Scaling is crucial to our growth and development inside the gym. We need to scale appropriately to ensure we are pushing to get what WE need from the workout. When we start to think less of the work we do, we don’t acknowledge the true progress we are making. Sometimes we may find ourselves facing a workout we need to scale quite a bit based on where we are as athletes and that is OKAY! Scaling is extremely valuable and one of the things that makes CrossFit so impactful. Being infinitely scalable means anyone can reap the benefits of the CrossFit training methodology. 

Arthur Ashe put it best when he said, “Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.” We all come to CrossFit from a different space and it’s important to remember our own progress is going to look different from others. Scaling allows us to embrace this and effectively work toward our goals. Not sure how to scale appropriately sometimes? That’s fine ask the coach, have a conversation and always remember that scaling IS extremely valuable, no matter how much you have to scale.

We are LEVEL METHOD licensed!

We are always looking at the best ways to improve what we’re doing, and how we can provide an even better experience. It’s important to constantly evolve and evaluate how we can be better. Just like we tell all of you, our members!

We’ve had an eye on the Level Method for a year, met with its founder and developer, spent multiple hours researching and truly believe it is a game changer in the CrossFit world.

We are FIRED UP to implement the Level Method, and confident it will be an amazing addition to the College Hill community.

Check out the MAP (“Method of Athletic Progression”) during your next class as it is a detailed yet easy-to-understand chart of athletic tests that measure.

You’ll see a colorful board consisting of Levels moving left to right (separated by vertical lines), and Categories from top to bottom (separated by horizontal lines).

Each category has an upper number (MALE Standard) and a lower number (FEMALE Standard) and there are 32 Levels in each category.

The Level Method measures your fitness across 15 categories that cover 10 “energy systems” and over 60 different functional movements and variations. 🏋🏽

Basically, you’re going to see a TRUE snapshot 📸 of where your fitness is!

The 15 categories are comprised of things like Upper Body Pull, Deadlift, and Running.

Each category moves from left to right →, from beginner to advanced, and correspond to colored levels, similar to a martial arts belt ranking system.

The information you obtain through these tests will show you exactly where you are in your fitness journey.

Knowing exactly where you are in your fitness journey is the first step needed to safely and effectively progress toward your goals.

How will it be implemented? 

Beginning Monday, January 13th we’ll begin assessments in all regular CrossFit classes over the course of 2 weeks. There are tons of opportunities to make up missed workouts, so no worries if you can’t make a certain day.

How is this a game changer? 

●  Accurate representation of current fitness level

●  Shows improvements in multiple areas

●  Visible path of where to improve & set goals

●  Clear communication and guidance from coaches

●  Meshes perfectly with what we are currently doing

●  Better understanding of “why” behind training

●  Ensures correct safety & development

Throughout the following few days you will be receiving a series of non-boring 😂, fun emails so you can get the most out of the Level method.

Until then, keep an open mind, have fun, and buckle up for a great journey! 🚀

Yours in fitness,

The College Hill Team!

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NUTRIENT IV THERAPY AT COLLEGE HILL!

IV Hydration Therapy Is HERE!

ABOUT IV HYDRATION THERAPY

Nearly 75% of Americans don’t consume the daily amount of water recommended by the Institute of Medicine. This means that most people in the U.S. are chronically dehydrated. IV hydration therapy is an easy way to ensure you are getting enough fluids to keep you hydrated and operating at optimum health. The therapy treatments intravenously deliver fluids, vitamins and other nutritional supplements directly and safely into your bloodstream.

By delivering fluids and vitamins directly to your bloodstream, you’re able to almost immediately absorb 100% of these nutrients and take larger quantities of them. For example, with Vitamin C, you can only take 5 grams by mouth before stomach distress. But, through an IV, we can administer more than 10x this amount of vitamin C.

Whether you’re training, designing your recovery plan, or recovering from an injury, Dr. Cat’s team can help integrate IV hydration to optimize your efforts. They are looking forward to helping you achieve your athletic goals.

WHY IV THERAPY FOR ATHLETES?

Athletes committed to optimal health and performance understand the benefits of proper hydration and diet. Professional and amateur athletes also know the importance of effective recovery plans for intense training and events.  Cellular damage, muscle soreness and fatigue, and a weakened immune system can keep you from returning to normal activities for many weeks, and sometimes longer.

This is why we have partnered with Dr. Cat’s IV Drip Bar.  The Myers’ Cocktail has become one of our most popular treatments. The Myers’ Cocktail has a combination of vitamins and fluids that hydrate, reduce inflammation, increase muscle recovery and boost your immune system. The package also includes a B12 shot which sustains the benefits of the IV while also improving your energy, mood and sleep. All of this helps you recover fully, faster.

“THE MYERS’ COCKTAIL” FOR WELLNESS + PERFORMANCE

The Myers’ Cocktail is focused on treating people before they’re ill and keeping people operating at their best, which is why everyone loves it. Being surrounded by people who are choosing to improve their health and wellness is what drives Dr. Cat’s team every day. When you schedule an appointment, you’ll meet with either Cathrin Olsen or Ren Bizzell to discuss the reason for your visit. Once they have determined your best treatment, your IV is administered and you will sit back and relax in a private room, equipped with TV, Wi-Fi and comfortable chaise lounge chairs.

All of the IV hydration therapies are administered by experienced, board-certified physicians, registered nurses and licensed paramedics, are safe and are highly effective.

RESERVATION LINK — > https://app.acuityscheduling.com/schedule.php?owner=18433807

Energy Systems Exploration

As a living, breathing, blog reading individual you’ve probably learned the basics around how food provides the body with energy. There are actually several different ways that this can occur and they depend on the activity being performed. Depending on our sport or activity, nutrition, genetics, and level of training will each play a role which energy system is primarily utilized. As you can see in the pictures above these athletes have trained to optimize a certain energy system in their body to improve performance at their respective sport. Regardless of which energy system is predominantly used all energy is stored in the form of ATP.

Adenosine Triphosphate or “ATP” is the energy currency of the body. Each of the energy systems in the body have their own way of producing ATP to power our daily activities. There are pro’s and con’s to each energy system but ultimately having a better understanding of how our body uses energy can help us make informed decisions on diet and exercise. Let’s learn about each energy system…

Alactic System aka the Creatine Phosphate System
Lactic Acid System aka Glycolytic
Aerobic System aka Fatty Acid Metabolism

“No matter how many mistakes you make or how slow you progress, you are still way ahead of everyone who isn’t trying.” —Tony Robbins

Alactic System

(aka the Creatine Phosphate System)
What is it: The alactic system utilizes creatine phosphate (CP) as an energy source. It fuels high intensity efforts. Creatine is able to donate its phosphate molecules to the the Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP) molecule allowing it to return to ATP, with potential energy stored in its chemical bonds. Creatine comes from the food that we eat with the highest levels in red meat, pork, poultry, and fish. It can also be supplemented for vegetarians and vegans.

Time domains: This energy system is exhausted in 8-12 seconds for most individuals and you will fatigue when your CP and ATP stores have depleted. It is great for quick bursts of energy.

Efficiency:It requires 30 seconds to 2 minutes to replenish energy stores.

By products: Heat released from the breaking of chemical bonds.

Examples of activity: You may see this energy system in action through the short powerful bursts seen in weightlifters, powerlifters, pitchers, and shot putters.
What training looks like: Training the CP system means using short time domains with long rest periods in between. In the gym this means keeping rep ranges to sets of 6 or fewer reps.

Lactic Acid System

(aka Glycolytic system)
What is it: The lactic acid system utilizes glycogen (glucose stored in the muscles and liver) as a fuel source. It is for longer lasting high intensity activities. Our body is able to store about 500 total grams of glycogen in the muscle and liver tissue which provides around 2,000 calories worth of energy. Running out of this fuel source is commonly referred to as “bonking.” Some athletes consume carbohydrate foods, drinks, and supplements during training and competition to prevent running out of this valuable fuel source.

Time domains: It is the primary fuel source for activities lasting from 30 seconds to about 3 minutes. You know you have fatigued this energy system when hydrogen ion accumulation causes a burning sensation in the muscles.

Efficiency: The lactic acid system is very efficient at providing fuel but fatigues quickly. Due to the long recovery time it is favorable to alternate levels of intensity between glycolytic and aerobic dependence to sustain high output.

By products: The byproduct of this system is pyruvate. Which must be cleared from the blood to continue to utilize this energy system. This can take 30-60 minutes.
Examples of activity: This energy system would rule during a 400 or 800 meter sprint, a hockey lines time on the ice, or most CrossFit workouts. It is seen in mixed use with the aerobic system during longer workouts or soccer and basketball games where the players alternate between a slower jog pace with periods of intense sprinting and jumping.

What training looks like: To train this energy system you can utilize interval style training. Intense bursts of energy followed by a recovery period that allows you to stay at a threshold of high output. These athletes tend to have increased muscle mass and ideally lower body fat percentage.

Aerobic System

(aka Fatty Acid Metabolism aka Krebs Cycle aka Citric Acid Cycle…)
What is it: This is the creation of energy from fat, glycogen or protein in the presence of oxygen used to power low and moderate intensity activities. The mitochondria present in muscle cells takes the available fuel source through a variety of reactions to produce ATP. Since fat molecules packs 9 calories per gram they tend to be the main choice for this energy system. Even the leanest individuals carry enough body fat to fuel many days worth of activity.
Time domains: Any activity lasting more than 3 minutes in duration.

Efficiency: This system produces energy much more slowly than the others. The good news is it can utilize an unlimited fuel supply of fat.

By products: The aerobic system only produces water and carbon dioxide when generating ATP.

Examples of activity: This energy system is your predominant fuel source for jogging, cycling, swimming long distances, and most of your daily activities.

What training looks like: Athletes who have become efficient at using fat as a fuel source are able to convert the energy from fat more quickly, allowing them to sustain higher levels of work capacity for activities with long durations. These athletes are usually easy to spot as they have exceptional muscle definition and extremely low body fat.

As you can see from the graph, our average work capacity is dictated by the length of time we are performing an activity.By training in all three energy systems we can become more efficient in all areas, thus increasing our work capacity across the board.Individuals who only try to utilize cardio or lifting heavy weights to improve work capacity will fall short of their well rounded counterparts. If you’re an individual who wants to improve general health it is beneficial to train each of the energy systems.

If you’re ready to increase you work capacity and become more fit give us a call today and we’ll help you get started!

Strength Training for Injury Prevention

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” -Benjamin Franklin

Life is unpredictable and sometimes in our sports, exercise, and daily life we come out of these unpredictable situations a little bit worse for the wear…

Some folks try to prevent these situations from happening through avoidance, but if you want to have a high quality of life I highly recommend you adopt a strength training program as your physical insurance program. This is certainly a much more proactive approach to mitigating physical injury than hoping for the best.

“If you train hard, you’ll not only be hard, you’ll be hard to beat.” -Herschel Walker

Or if you are an athlete like Robert Griffin III (pictured above) you may want to consider the risk factors of your sport. Robert, aka RG3, came into the NFL and was an instant phenom and fan favorite for his dazzling display of athleticism that was so uncommon in quarterbacks. His jukes, spins, and leaps were no match for the demands professional football places on an athlete and RG3 has spent most of what was once a promising career watching from the sideline, injured.

You see, despite his athleticism, RG3 has not trained in a way that reinforced a fundamental movement pattern. As we look at the series of pictures highlighting the windup before an explosive jump, We see a valgus knee fault where his knees cave in creating a very compromised position for the joints of his lower extremities. Even though not all injuries are preventable, by focusing more on proper technique and exercises that stabilized the knee joint rather than increasing strength and speed RG3 may have avoided some major injuries in his career.

“There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.” -Beverly Sills

So what should a workout look like?
Exercise should replicate natural human movement patterns. The ones we encounter on a day to day basis. Squat, lunge, hinge, push, pull, rotate and walk. Most exercises fall into at least one and sometimes several of these movement patterns. By addressing all of them in our training we not only improve our functional strength but also prepare our bodies for anything life could throw at them.

In one study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine there was an 88% overall reduction in ACL injury rate in an intervention group of soccer players who participated in an injury prevention program. The right knowledge and a little consistency can go a long way when it comes down to keeping your body healthy.

Is your current training program addressing mobility, recovery, full range of motion, and then total body strength?

If you have suffered from injuries in the past or have concerns with your mobility it is important to address those with your trainer or coach. They will be able to help you by assessing the area of concern and designing a program to help you improve function with goals and checkpoints along the way. It is not always fun, easy, or sexy to do but giving attention to our problem areas will be easier to do the sooner you start.

“I hated every minute of training, but I said, ”Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.” -Muhammad Ali

Don’t be the dad who throws out his back building sand castles at the beach. Talk to one of our coaches and we’ll help you tackle your challenge areas today!

5 Reasons to get STRONG

Fitness trends come and go and most fall to the wayside for good reason.

Most programs fail to produce consistent results. It’s a wonder why so many folks stray away from what is tried and true when it comes to exercise programs?

“The rule is: the basics are the basic, and you can’t beat the basics.” -Charles Poliquin

Despite what your goals may be, every individual can benefit from physical resistance training. Not only that, but the health benefits extend far beyond your short term fitness goals. Regardless of why you train, let’s take a look at some of the reasons you should incorporate strength training into your fitness regimen.

1. Training for strength produces results.

Whatever your goals, muscle will help you get there. Some companies in the fitness industry has made a fortune around buzzwords like “tone”, “lift”, and “sculpt.” The problem is there’s no way to measure those loose terms. If you want to change your body composition there is only the ability to gain or lose muscle while simultaneously gaining or losing fat. If you are looking for the most efficient way to do make a change then strength training is your best option.

Strength training, or physical resistance training, can be defined as a type of physical exercise specializing in the use of resistance to induce muscular contraction which builds the strength, anaerobic endurance, and size of skeletal muscles. When you gain muscle you increase your bodies basal metabolism (the amount of calories you burn each day before factoring in physical activity). It’s kind of like putting a bigger engine in a car. The car is capable of moving faster or pulling a heavier load (more muscle), but it also uses more fuel (fat) whether it’s cruising down the freeway or idling in the driveway. Strength training helps us “tone” through this muscle gain/fat loss trade.

2. “You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” -Peter Drucker

Training for strength provides a clear path for success. You can set training goals that are specific, measurable, and produce desired outcomes. A good coach will help you design a plan towards these goals with checkpoints along the way. Your strength training program is a road map to success with clear directions. Sets, reps, and weights lifted safely through the full range of motion are the signals that you’re on track. Many people find that a more detailed plan helps them stay motivated as they experience progress.

3. Age gracefully with more muscle mass.

As we get older strength training is one of the most important things we can do for our health. Physical independence is a key factor in a great quality of life.

A comprehensive study of strength training has been proven to:

  • Improve motor function
  • Lower resting heart rate
  • Increase stamina
  • Prevent sarcopenia (age related muscle loss)
  • Improve bone mineral density
  • Prevent and help rehab injuries

Functional strength training will be an asset in daily life too. From picking up grandchildren or bags of groceries to climbing stairs with confidence.

4. You’ll experience epic brain gains.

Did you know that lifting weights can strengthen your brain just as much as it does your body?
Dr. Yorgi Mavros from the University of Sydney has found that high‐intensity physical resistance training (PRT) results in significant improvements in cognitive function, muscle strength, and aerobic capacity in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Adults who followed a resistance training routine in addition to cognitive training performed significantly better than control groups on a series of mental tests. A couple key factors to note:

The participants exercised 2x/ week working to at least 80% of their peak strength.
The benefits lasted one year after the exercise prescription had ended.

What does that mean? According to Yorgi, “The stronger people became, the greater the benefit for their brain.” Let that sink in for a minute. You actually grow your brain by training to become stronger! It makes me wonder if Einstein developed his Theory of Relativity in between heavy sets of back squats…

5. Strong moms have healthy babies.

During pregnancy, the question always arises of what does fitness look like for this stage of life? With so much on the line, it’s important to consult with a doctor before beginning any fitness routine. Luckily, there is a tremendous amount to be gained by incorporating a strength training routine under normal circumstances. Resistance training can help alleviate symptoms and improve health outcomes for the mother and child. According to the Mayo Clinic, women who follow a consistent strength training routine during pregnancy can experience:

  • Reduce backaches, constipation, bloating and swelling
  • Boosted mood and energy levels
  • Better sleep
  • Prevent excess weight gain
  • Maintain levels of muscle strength and endurance
  • Reduced incidence of gestational diabetes

Not only that but women who train during pregnancy report enhanced body image and better psychological well-being!

We would love to help you live a healthy strong life. Schedule a Free Consult to learn more.